“Through the enormous dedication

of the people I worked with during this short period,

it’s been a very productive residency

that marked the beginning of a new body of work.”

-Berndnaut Smilde, 2015 Resident Artist 

 “I think the specifics of what I gained from the program will become more and more apparent in the years to come as new bodies of work develop. To have a significant amount of time away from the distractions of “normal” life and just focus on my art is such a valuable, and rare experience. Rebecca and Stephen, and the team at BMoCA were such great hosts and made me feel really welcome in the community.”

-James Tapscott, 2018 Resident Artist

 

 

 

  

“I think the residency was fruitful

with so many new elements added to my artistic practice,

which would be difficult to pursue without such opportunity

that gave me the time, the space

and the resources to make it happen.”

-Tomoko Sauvage, 2016 Resident Artist 


Exhibit at Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art

Exhibit at Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art

“Through the enormous dedication of the people I worked with during this short period, it’s been a very productive residency that marked the beginning of a new body of work.”

-Berndnaut Smilde, 2015 Resident Artist 

Berndnaut Smilde,

2015 Resident Artist

Project Description:

During a 6 week residency at BMoCA + Swoon in Boulder, Berndnaut teamed up with scientist Steve Tomczyk from NCAR to build a prototype prism that would allow him to break light at a large scale in order to impose a natural appearance onto its surrounding as a temporary hack in the landscape. (Image: At Teresa’s, 2015, Boulder, Co)

The photograph illustrates the first test on a barn from a distance of 130 meters on May 30 in Boulder, Colorado

 


Tomoko

“I think the residency was fruitful with so many new elements added to my artistic practice, which would be difficult to pursue without such opportunity that gave me the time, the space and the resources to make it happen.”

-Tomoko Sauvage, 2016 Resident Artist 

[Crystal Radio] Introduced by a Denver-based artist, Adan De La Garza, I worked with a Dever-based engineer, Tom Dodds, who made a crystal radio, a primitive radio receiver using crystalline mineral (crystal detector) and I experimented with different minerals such as galena, stibnite and pyrite. Unfortunately it took me long to find the right engineer to work with and there was not so much time left to experiment with the radio in different places. In the Tom’s studio, the radio received very well the radio waves, then at Swoon in Boulder it was catching much less radio waves probably because there are less radio stations in Boulder than in Denver. The idea was to try this out in the nature which I did in the Anemone Hill in Boulder at night – of course very few radio waves. But the overall experiment was really interesting for the following reasons : – Working on very primitive electronics = the sensation of trying to catch the radio waves in the air with this primitive tool in today’s highly technological era was somewhat fresh and inspiring especially for me working on ‘electronic’ music using technology. – The ‘sensual’ manipulation of electronics = the manipulation of this crystal radio is about finding the right positions on the surface of raw minerals with cat whisker (crystal detector) and this sensual and fine manipulation of electronics with natural material is very close to the technique to play my instrument ‘waterbowls’ thus it felt like a starting point of a new material to develop. – The visual impact of the minerals used for this project and the combination of the raw natural material and electricity. – The fascination about the scientific facts on minerals (their electrical conductivity, the history of their formation)

 

 

 

Tomoko Sauvage,

2016 Resident Artist

Project Description:

During the artist residency at Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art + Swoon, I worked on several geological materials and the soundscape of Colorado including the “sound of erosion” with metamorphic rocks and acid, crystal radio and recording in the TANK, an old resonant water tank situated in west Colorado. Those projects were made possible by lots of collaborations with local artists, engineers and artisans and the inspirations also came from different meetings in the local art community.

[Recording in the nature at night - Anemone Hill (Boulder)] I invited a Boulder-based artist, Ryan Wade Ruhlen and his orchestra, Rumpilots to play music to the sound of crickets in the nature at night. A part of the recordings was played at the last presentation.

[Metamorphic stones and acid] Introduced by Marda Kirn, I met Victor Creazzi, who practices the razor horns in experimenting with locally found stones. He told me about the metamorphic stones such as limestones that react to acid with effervescent effects. I have been working on effervescent sound in amplified water using porous ceramic. This time I used lemon juice as acid and locally found stones to listen to effervescent sound of metamorphic rocks. According to my research, the rock formations seen in the Colorado landscapes are often made by acid-containing ground water. So the produced sound was almost the sound of erosion. Victor also showed me the way he was working with razor horns and it was inspiring.
[Recording at the TANK] The Denver-based artists, Adan De La Garza and Jenna Maurice brought me to the TANK in Rangely, Colorado, a once-abandoned 65′ tall 40′ wide steel water tank transformed into a place for sonic arts because of its unique acoustics (long reverberation). I made some improvisation-based compositions using locally found quartz, porcelain pieces and the voice. One of the compositions is about pronouncing words and texts related to mining with whispery voices that circulate in the room inspired by mining “ghost towns” I visited near Boulder. I invited Adan and Jenna to perform in those compositions. Some parts of the recordings were played during the last presentation at Swoon.

I think the residency was fruitful with so many new elements added to my artistic practice, which would be difficult to pursue without such opportunity that gave me the time, the space and the resources to make it happen. Thank you very much for giving me this opportunity. I will keep you updated about the on-going projects related to the residency.

______
Tomoko Sauvage August 17, 2016

D3S8960-copieArtist updates from their time spent here at Swoon Art House:

You can find a part of Tomoko Sauvage’s project (recording session in the Anemone trail in Boulder with Ryan Wade Ruhlen and his fellow musicians), here. This project was mixed and release on his cassette label.

Sauvage is currently processing another piece out of another recording done in Colorado with other folks. There will be further information to come about this project.

The artist is still in touch with Colorado folks – she once organized a small event “Colorado love” at an alternative space – to show video works, live skype performance of the local artists she met during her time in Colorado.


James Tapscott,

2018 Resident Artist

Project Description:

While I was in Boulder I wasn’t working on any single specific project, rather opening new doorways for projects into the future. A month is a short amount of time to get anything completed so it was just a great opportunity to focus my thoughts on new ideas and use the resources (mostly the minds of the professors and researchers at the universities) available to develop new concepts. I wanted to start something – or at least open a doorway, I could continue with at home. I ended up with 3 or 4 “workable” ideas to continue with and am currently evolving one of them into a collaborative project with a glass artist here in Melbourne. I spent a couple of days at the Ice Core Facility in Denver (the NSAICF) examining and photographing the Ice Core samples (drilled from Antarctica and around 400,000 years old) with some really interesting results. One kind of photographic process we were using had never been done before with the particular samples we were using and so it was a really valuable experience for everyone. We’re now trying to re-create the effects of the photography with glass on a larger scale, as sculptural works – still experimenting with the processes involved but will hopefully see some great results sometime in the next few months.

I also had some great learning experiences with a few of the more technologically minded professors at CU, a crash course in optics and laser building from one of the true pioneers in that field (Merrill Lessley) and an introduction to floatation tank therapy from MC Flux which I’m continuing to use as a creative tool.

“I think the specifics of what I gained from the program will become more and more apparent in the years to come as new bodies of work develop. To have a significant amount of time away from the distractions of “normal” life and just focus on my art is such a valuable, and rare experience. Rebecca and Stephen, and the team at BMoCA were such great hosts and made me feel really welcome in the community.”

-James Tapscott, 2018 Resident Artist